Beginner

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Beginner

Postby srdeo » Fri Mar 30, 2012 1:12 pm

hi
I am a long time snowboarder looking to get into skiing hoping I can get into moguls in as short time as possible.
Mogul really is the only reason I want to get into skiing since i can do other stuff on Snowboard. And maybe slalom since ski seems to have more control.
How long does one take before one can be skilled enough to enjoy moguls?
I understand it depends on the person, but if it's like 10+ years maybe it's not worth pursuing.
I don't expect it to be easy but would like to know how hard. I am hoping in 2 or 3 years I can be skilled enough to enjoy them. Don't expect to be an expert but good enough to enjoy them.
I would think snowboarding would help rather than hurt, but I am not really sure. I've been snowboarding for 20 years.

Also, what kind of skis do you recommend? Obviously, beginner intermediate skis, but i want something that is not completely opposite of what i intended to use.
Please recommend something from the past since i plan to buy them used. For boots i have old Raichle Flexon i use to snowboard (hard boots).
In general, am i looking for softer skis with narrow waist? or is it better to have stiffer short skis? What kind of side cut should i look for?
What length is good? Are moguls skis sized shorter? I am 6'2 230-240lbs

I am leaning towards Volkl skis only because i have their board and like how they feel, but again skis could be totally different.
But i am not against any other brands. I want something i can use as beginner and progress with into what i want to do.
Is Volkl P40 Platinum Energy Frame 173cm with Marker M7.2 Logic 2 or G30 Vertigo 178cm Marker M8.1 SC Selective Control a good option?


Any suggestion is appreciated.
Thanks
srdeo
 
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Re: Beginner

Postby PomfretPlunge » Fri Mar 30, 2012 9:07 pm

Hi SR

Here are some thoughts about starting up on moguls, FWIW. I dunno what the transition from snowboard to skis is gonna be like for you, but let's assume you'll manage that OK and you can get to basic stability & sense of speed & control relatively quickly.

I was a mogul newbie 4 years ago and am now having lots of fun. I had a 30 year foundation of skiing but was at absolute zero in bumps, couldn't ski 'em at all. I did really poorly the first year, started making OK progress in year 2, and 3&4 have felt good. I probably ski 50-60 days a year and have focused it all on learning bumps. I figured I would focus all my time on the slopes on mogul technique in order to really try to get it. As another comparison, we have kids in our group who are just starting to ski, and by learning bump technique right away, they are already doing well & having fun by the second year, at prob. 20-30 days per year. Those are kids with good athletic background.

Starting from scratch, the single biggest thing is to learn a good flats turn because that is the foundation of the whole thing. The hardest part for me was picking it up in bits & pieces from lots of different sources. Eventually it all came together in sortof a 7-step sequence thru the flats turn. To learn bump technique, the key thing will be to find people to ski with who know freestyle technique. Go out & ski with them over & over & over and get lots of consistent advice. Then take their advice & drills and go practice 'em on your own for hours & hours. Make sure they tell you about knee roll very early on, and try to get 'em to walk you through the turn in a logical sequence from the start to the finish. We have a small, great group in our area (mid-Atlantic) and you gotta see if you can find a person or a group in your area and go learn regularly. Another thing you could do would be to attach yourself to a local freestyle team and do drills with 'em if they'll let you.

One of the biggest things that may be tricky for you is that on the snowboard, you may have gotten used to leaning over to carve arcs. In mogul skiing, you gotta stand up straight and not lean your body side to side. You still carve, but you get that by rolling your knees from side to side while still standing up straight. Rolling the knees rolls the skis from one edge to the other while the body stays vertical.

For skis, with your height & weight, you want something longer than 175s. You are also starting from scratch so you probably don't want to go straight to a mogul ski. Maybe go to bump skis in year 2 or 3. For your first year, I would think maybe something like a mid-fat all-mountain with medium stiffness. Not too soft. No more than 85mm underfoot and maybe 100 or 105 mm tip. I would go with 180, 185 or 190 length at your height & weight. For bindings, you can probably start right away with mogul-type bindings. The Look Pivot 14 is a good one. It is super smooth & easy to step in and out of. For boots -- ask other people, I dunno. For poles, get short ones. At 6'2" you could use 44, 46 or 48" poles, no longer.

Watch lots of mogul skiing videos and get the motions into your eyes & mind.

Peace
Plunge
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Re: Beginner

Postby srdeo » Fri Mar 30, 2012 9:50 pm

Thanks plunge for taking time to write a lot of useful information..
I don't really understand what knee roll is but i get what you mean by your upper body stays still and your ski moves one edge to the other.
We also carve that way on snowboard. We call them cross under carving. And we also carve the way you describe, leaning over to carve (cross over).
It makes sense since crossunder changes edges much quicker. I have friends out west that are good mogul skiers so once i have the basics down and have good control of tight radius turns i will give them a visit.
thanks again
srdeo
 
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Re: Beginner

Postby PomfretPlunge » Sat Mar 31, 2012 10:48 pm

John Smart explains knee roll: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1W9Eaqp2uE

He shows the actual movement from 0:52 to 1:04 in the left pane of the video.

Don't try this on its own. You gotta get a freestyler to explain the whole bump turn to you in person. But once you have that explanation, this is a very key part at the core of the turn, which it helps to learn early on in your progression.
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